Home » Sociology » THE TRADITIONAL SOCIETY AND CRIME MANAGEMENT: A STUDY OF OWERRI NORTH INDIGENOUS...

THE TRADITIONAL SOCIETY AND CRIME MANAGEMENT: A STUDY OF OWERRI NORTH INDIGENOUS METHOD OF MANAGING CRIME

Sold By: Joe Project Store | Item Type: Project Material | Report this?  |  Attributes: 54 pages | 1-5 chapters | Amount: ₦5,000 | Marked useful: 1,266 times

Delivery: Within 24 hours

THE TRADITIONAL SOCIETY AND CRIME MANAGEMENT: A STUDY OF OWERRI NORTH INDIGENOUS METHOD OF MANAGING CRIME

CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION

  1. Background of the Study

Crime and deviance are worldwide occurrences. Not every member of society follows societal standards or regulations. Crime management  is so essential to protect people and property in communities. Whilst the government is responsible for protecting lives and property, people can also play an important role in community security (Kasali Odetola, 2016). Crime and deviance are avoided and regulated in various ways throughout cultures (Uhm, van, 2018). Throughout the early phases of society development in England, individuals of diverse groups were responsible for crime prevention and control (Salter, 2014). Prior to the current official manner of police, there was informal community-based policing (known as the "Watch"), in which volunteers were responsible for policing neighbourhoods, according to Potter (2013)cited in (Uhm, van, 2018)

Corollary, Ajayi, (2018) acknowledged the usage of informal techniques of crime control and criminal sentencing in Africa. Almost all ethnic groups or communities in Nigeria continue to practise some type of traditional law enforcement and control. According to Alemika (1993) referenced in Owumi, Ajayi (2016), crime control refers to the police and other state intelligence and security agencies' coercive and ideological techniques of controlling social life, as well as other mechanisms put in place to suppress activities that risk social order. Violators of social norms face negative penalties based on the severity of the offence, and those who breach norms face punishment/sanctions . This is done for both targeted and broad deterrence. Laws differ between societies in terms of who may be designated as an offender, the penalties for specific offenses, and how to repair damaged social interactions. According to Ordu Nnam (2017), harmful actions should be criminalized and laws against them implemented in order to safeguard lives and property. Despite the fact that the Nigerian police force is constitutionally mandated to safeguard the whole country, the necessity of police collaboration with indigenous communities has resulted in the implementation of community policing. Yet, according to Gbenemene Adishi (2017), there has been little progress in this region due to the nature of the interaction between the police and members of the community, which is characterized by police suspicion and unwillingness to share authority with civilians. Yet, indigenous tribes continue to use informal policing practised.

It is worth noting that the establishment of an official police force has diminished the use of indigenous policing practises. Several authors have remarked that contemporary, government-based, law-enforcement agencies' efforts to prevent and regulate crime in Nigeria have not delivered the anticipated results, since the crime rate continues to climb (Ayuk Emeka Uyang, 2015). Against this backdrop, this research focuses on the Owerri North community's indigenous approach to crime prevention and control.

    1. Statement of the problem

In ancient Igbo society, crime was defined as major transgressions of the people's standardised ways of behaving, customs, and traditions. Crime was described as a 'abomination,' with far-reaching societal ramifications not just for the criminal but also for his immediate family and near relations. These outcomes include bad luck, sickness, and death. As a result, individuals attempted to adapt to their society's norms, practises, and traditions in order to avoid being sanctioned by their communities or being afflicted by the gods with dreadful and incurable diseases. According to Ricken (2015), the informal criminal justice system addresses concerns of local crime and security in traditional communities. According to Abdulqadir (2016), informal techniques of crime control are popular on the one hand because they are accessible, affordable, and rapid. On the other side, they may be chastised for being discriminatory towards women and other disadvantaged groups, as well as for failing to adhere to international norms. According to Melton (1995), outside of the African continent, indigenous systems of crime management coexist with the modern system of criminal justice administration. Aiyedun Odor (2016) noticed that, despite the advent of English policing procedures, traditional African means of upholding justice continue to exist.

Notably, early missionaries and anthropologists, as well as historians and scholars, have written extensively on the Igbo traditional society. In Nigeria, research has focused on the informal policing tactics utilised by different ethnic groups. Yet, there hasn't been much published on crime and criminal management in traditional Igbo culture. This study is a modest attempt toward addressing this gap. More specifically, the study examines the traditional society and crime management: a study of Owerri North indigenous method of managing crime.

1.3 Objective of the study

The broad objective of this study is focused on the traditional society and crime management: a study of Owerri North indigenous method of managing crime. Other specific objectives includes:

  1. To examine what constitutes a criminal offence in traditional Owerri North community?

  2. To find out who are the informal law enforcers in Owerri North community?

  3. To explore the indigenous ways in which violations of law are dealt with?

  4. To examine the public's perception on the efficacy of indigenous methods of crime prevention and control.

1.4 Research Questions

  1. What constitutes a criminal offence in traditional Owerri North community?

  2. Who are the informal law enforcers in Owerri North community?

  3. In which indigenous ways are violations of law dealt with?

  4. What is your perception about the efficacy of indigenous and formal methods of crime prevention and control?

1.5 Significance of the study

Findings of the study will reveal the autochthonous structure of dealing with offenders that has effectively controlled crime in the study area. This study will be helpful to formal law enforcement agencies as they an synergize their efforts with the community for crime prevention and control. For instance, confession may be elicited from suspects through the use of unyom Owerri North without inflicting bodily harm.The study will will also be beneficial formal law enforcement agencies should enhance their collaboration with such communities through effective community policing. Through this, the latter could adequately assist the police in preventing and controlling crime, and the police could ensure that offenders are treated in line with the provisions of criminal law.The findings may also be helpful to the ministry of justice, National cohesion and constitutional affairs to establish traditional and justice in the use of traditional institutions and methods in determining and dispensing justice. To help the court system to have training manuals for in-service courses for special magistrates, judges and traditional experts on the Activities, methods, relevance and the challenges towards the contribution of the traditional institution in crime management in modern Nigeria. The study will contribute to the general body of knowledge. Students, writers, and academics who are involved in conducting more studies in this area may find the analysis extremely useful.

1.7 Scope of the study

The scope of this study borders on the traditional society and crime management: a study of Owerri North indigenous method of managing crime. The study further examine what constitutes a criminal offence in traditional Owerri North community, find out who are the informal law enforcers in Owerri North community, explored the indigenous ways in which violations of law are dealt with and examined the public's perception on the efficacy of indigenous methods of crime prevention and control. The study is however delimited to Owerri North Communities.

1.8 Limitation of the study

Like in every human endeavour, the researchers encountered slight constraints while carrying out the study. The significant constraint was the scanty literature on the subject owing that traditional rulers council and conflict resolution discourse is vast thus the researcher incurred more financial expenses and much time was required in sourcing for the relevant materials, literature, or information and in the process of data collection, which is why the researcher resorted to a limited choice of sample size covering only residents Owerri North. Thus findings of this study cannot be used for generalization for other states within Nigeria. Additionally, the researcher will simultaneously engage in this study with other academic work will impede maximum devotion to the research. Howbeit, despite the constraint encountered during the research, all factors were downplayed in other to give the best and make the research successful.

1.8 Definition of terms

Crime: an action or omission which constitutes an offence and is punishable by law.

Traditional Society: traditional society refers to a society characterized by an orientation to the past, not the future, with a predominant role for custom and habit.


This material content is developed to serve as a GUIDE for students to conduct academic research



Delivery: Within 24 hours

  • Reference(s):

    Available

  • Methodology: Yes available


Advertise Here

For advertisement, call 08168958821

Not what you were looking for? Perform a search

What's your project topic?


Comment on Facebook: